Sforzesco Castle

Sforzesco Castle (11).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (11).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (2).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (6).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (1).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (8).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (5).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (4).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (13).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (3).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (12).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (14).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (7).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (15).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (10).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (16).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (17).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (18).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (9).jpg
Sforzesco Castle (19).jpg
Unnamed Road Milano Lombardia 20121 IT

What we see today is only a part of the original citadel which, at the beginning, consisted of other forts enclosed in a great star-shaped ramparted fortress. The perimetral development of the present quadrilateral, however, makes it Italy’s largest castle, and its construction would be the most beautiful of its kind had it not been subject to the injustice of time and men. But, even as it stands today, it is a majestic work, which hides behind its walls, extremely interesting Gothic-Renaissance halls and courtyards.

The castle was rebuilt in 1450 by Francesco Sforza on the ruins of the viscounty fort, which, in its turn, had been built on the ruins of the Porta Giovia castle which had been knocked down by the people during the “ Golden Ambrosian Republic ”. Under the rule of Lodovico Maria Sforza, known as the “ Moor ” (1495), the castle became one of the most important royal palaces, and the best known artists and architects of the time worked on it, among others Bramante and the great master Leonardo. On the death of Francesco II, the last of the Sforzas, its regal period came to an end and it became no more than a fortress. During the Spanish, French and Austrian dominations it was used as military barracks and underwent so much damage and rough treatment that it could only be considered little more than a ruin.

During the Napoleonic period a radical transformation was planned, so radical as to make it unrecognizable, and in 1859, with the defeat of the Austrians, it was used again as military’ barracks for the garrison troops. In 1890, when the troops were evacuated, it was decided to restore it, the job being given to the architect Luca Beltrami, who gave so much towards the saving of this famous monument. In 1893 the military authorities handed over the castle to the City, and so the transformation of the gloomy barracks into the present magnificent building, into the Archeological Museum, this is found in Corso Magenta. Other valuable archeological remains are to be found in the basements of houses in the historical centre of the city.

The barbaric raiders who invaded Italy during the course of the centuries, passed through Milan, plundering and destroying as they did so. The last destruction which it suffered were the 1943 bombing raids. From the ruins of Milan was built a greater and more industrial city, this was due to its talented and strong willed population. Milan was not the Longobard capital although it was the residence of Duke Albino, who had taken up court at the ” Curia Ducis ’’ where Cordusio now- stands, in fact the name of the square is derived from this court.

Charlemagne, king of the Franks, succeeded to the Longobard domination, but very few signs of this domination remain; a few ruins of the “Regio Ducale Palazzo” — also know as Arengo — remain of the Comunal period, these are incorporated into the Royal Palace, and the “Palazzo della Ragione” in Piazza Mercanti which was the commercial heart of medieval Milan.

The various stages of Milan’s history are bound up to the development of the city. From the time of the shortlived Torrianis period, to the Viscontis, to the Sforzas under Ludovico the Moor, right up to the sixteenth century when Milan was the heart of humanistic studies, and the Lombardic artistic Renaissance was at its height.

After the fall of the Sforzas, Milan fell under French, then Spanish and finallv, under Austrian domination. Under the rule of Mary Teresa of Austria, thanks to the stimulation of the Illuminists of Milan such as Beccaria, Verri and others, the organization of public administration became possible, this was done by creating the cadastre.

Then followed the Cisalpina Republic, follow-ed by Napoleon’s Italian Republic, and after the fall of Napoleon the Austrians returned. The year 1848, with its fatidical “Five Days’’, brought to Milan a short-lived moment of freedom which was to be followed by the worst period of Austrian domination. Only in 1859 did Milan and Lombardy cease to be under the domination of some foreign power.

Milan was, bv that time, the capital city of a kingdom, but it ceased to be independent and entered the nation as a city, to become an ever developing part of it.

From the fort courtyard one can go down into the underground archeological museum which contains some really interesting pieces. Here we can find a documentation of the ruin and reconstruction of the castle itself.

Since 1902 the ground floor rooms of the fort have housed the Historic Civic Archives. Since the war the seat has been enlarged and renewed, not only the rooms but other plants have been modernized and put in working order. The preserved documents date back to 1385 and go up to the XIXth. century, some even to 1927. The Archive also contains many Portiani documents. The Trivulzian library, bought by the city in 1935 is also attached to the Civic Archives, this contains 40,000 volumes, 1,500 manuscripts and 130 illuminated manuscripts.

The Bertarelli print collection bears the name of its founder, who, by giving his precious collection donated the first and most valuable part. It is a collection of prints of all kinds, from the artistic to the most popular kind. It is the only institute of its kind in Italy which contains so much iconographical material, and writers and editors often turn to them for the illustration of books and magazines.

Piccolo Teatro (1).png
Just a few meters from Via Dante and next to the old Palazzo del Carmagnola is the Piccolo Teatro that was founded in 1947 by Paolo Grassi and Giorgio Strehler. The aim was not ...
La Triennale di Milano  (4).jpg
The exact name of this international exposition is “Esposizione Internazionale delle Arti Decorative e Industrial Moderne e dell Architettura Moderna”. It exhibits contemporary ...
Palazzo Litta (4).jpg
Also known as “Palazzo Arese”, it was enlarged by the Litta family in 1700. The architect B.Bolla was commissioned to work over Richini’s original construction...
San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore (3).jpg
0.55 km
The church is at 15 Corso Magenta. It was consecrated in 1519. It belonged to a convent of Benedictine nuns called “Maggiore” because it was the largest and most imp...
Basilica of San Simpliciano (2).jpg
0.55 km
This Basilica was one of the first churches to be constructed in Milan-Sant’Ambrogio was responsible for initiating the plans to build it (4th cent.) but it was completed ...
Brera Picture Gallery (1).jpg
0.68 km
The name Brera come from the place where the “Umiliati” (an order of religious men and laymen) built their house within the city walls in about 1170. In the 13th century t...
Palazzo Clerici (1).jpg
0.73 km
This splendid palace, built in the early decades of the 18th century contains a magnificent gallery of tapestries and a famous fresco painted by Giambattista Tiepolo about 1740,...
Ca' de Sass.jpg
0.77 km
The Museum of History, ‘Ca’ de sass”, so called on account of the large stones projecting from its exterior walls, is housed in a small building on 11 Via Ande...
The Arch of Peace (2).jpg
0.79 km
Found in the semicircular opening of Piazzale Sempione, this is a regular construction with precise height limits; the Arch of Peace rising in isolation is considered the most r...
San Marco Church in Milan (5).jpg
0.81 km
The church was constructed about 1254 on the site of one already in existence dedicated to St. Mark. It was built to show the Venetians Milan’s appreciation for having reb...
Palazzo Borromeo (4).jpg
0.82 km
The rather plain façade of this 15th century mansion is interesting for its Gothic entrance. Its pointed arch is accented with two colors of cut stone and by three marble border...
Museum of the Risorgimento (3).jpg
0.83 km
(National Revival) – (23 Via Borgonuovo tel. 803.539) – Exhibits dating from the mid-18th century to 1914 in which there was a national revival and struggle to unite...
Teatro alia Scala (Scala Theatre) (1).jpg
The building with severe lines stands on one side of the Piazza della Scala. In the center of the square is the monument to Leonardo da Vinci by the sculptor Pietro Magni (1872)...
Leonardo Da Vinci, Piazza Della Scala, Milan, Italy.JPG
0.89 km
In the center of the plaza we find the Monument to Leonardo da Vinci by Pietro Magni (1872). Four statues of the Milanese disciples of Leonardo, Marco d’Oggriono, G. Anton...
Piazza Mercanti (5).jpg
0.93 km
Between the Piazza Mercanti and Via Mercanti – just west of the Duomo – there is a group of buildings that splendidy illustrates the development of Milanese architec...
The Ambrosian Library and its Art Gallery (2).jpg
Founded bv Cardinal Federico Borromeo in 1609 and built by Fabio Mangone and Francesco Maria Richini, the Ambrosian Library is one of the most remarkable demonstrations of the g...
Loggia degli Osii (2).jpg
0.93 km
The Loggia of the Osii was built by Matteo Visconti in 1316. It was restored in 1904 and the deformations of the XVIIth. and XVIIIth. centuries were removed. The façade, with tw...
Basilica of Sant’Ambrogio  (13).jpg
0.95 km
This Basilica, which stands in the square bearing the same name, reflects sixteen centuries of history. It is the queen and mother of Lombard churches. This Paleo-Christian buil...
Church of San Sepolcro (1).jpg
0.96 km
It has been remodeled many times since its founding in 1030; the faÇade however, has been restored to its primitive Lombard style. A vast crypt, that extends the length of the c...
Palazzo Marino (1).jpg
0.96 km
This was built between 1553 and 1558 by Galeazzo Alessi for the Genoese merchant. Tommaso Marino The courtyard walls and columns are richly adorned with modeled concrete heads, ...
Showing 1 - 20 of 75 results
Sforzesco Castle (10).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (16).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (17).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (11).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (18).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (2).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (9).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (6).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (19).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (1).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (8).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (5).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (4).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (13).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (3).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (12).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (14).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (7).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Sforzesco Castle (15).jpg 2 years ago
  • You must to post comments
Showing 19 results